FAQ

Structural Integration FAQ

What is Structural Integration (Rolf Method)?
The goal of Structural Integration is to obtain balance and alignment, serving both structure and function within the field of gravity by freeing and unwrapping the connective tissue called fascia. Fascia is a thin yet fibrous tissue that is the binding tissue and support of the body. If you’ve skinned chicken breasts, it’s the white tissue that is between the meat and the skin.

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What is the Structural Integration ten-series?
The Structural Integration ten-series is the typical progression whereby the client receives ten, one-hour sessions addressing every part of the body to achieve balance and alignment as a whole. Each hour is a progression of the series. Sessions range from 55-75 minute in length due to customization. Structural Integration works by lengthening and opening the connective tissue to obtain greater freedom and function in the body. Old patterns and tendencies are replaced with new, optimal patterns. As a result, the thickened, toughened tissue becomes soft, re-hydrated and more pliable, and allows movement and flexibility. Structural Integration changes the body because it reorganizes the imbalances in the tissue, creating overall balance throughout. Ideally, the ten-series would be performed one session a week for ten weeks.

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What does Gravity have to do with Structural Integration?
No other force in the world is as dramatic or potent as gravity and it’s the law that affects every body on the planet. For example, as we age we lose circulation, height, flexibility, and prolapsed organs can occur. These are only a few affects gravity produces, but certainly critical to health and well-being. Because of repetitive motions and overuse of our bodies, imbalances are created. Some may call these problems, but they’re merely an unavoidable result of the constant force of gravity. Structural integration aims to create lift from gravity by working with connective tissue to combat the downward force that pulls at the body over time.

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How do fascia, connective tissue, and muscles relate to Structural Integration and what is the difference?
Fascia is a thin, fibrous, strong tissue that envelopes and connects muscles. If you imagine an orange, it’s similar to the pith that encases the whole orange and it’s segments. Think of the slice of the orange as the muscle and the shiny protective casing as the fascia. Connective tissue is broad word, but can be classified within four categories. Its main purpose is to create structure and support connecting two or more types of connective tissue across the body. Connective tissue as a whole should be resilient, flexible, responsive to gravity and hydrated. When imbalances are created, connective tissue becomes dehydrated, coarse, and shortened. Over time, the imbalances create strain in the body that can be felt by stiffness, general discomfort, the reduction of flexibility and movement.

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Will Structural Integration hurt?
Structural Integration practitioners gained an early reputation associated with pain, but the work has advanced and evolved since then. There are several factors to be considered if Structural Integration will hurt. First, there are areas in the body that hold chronic tension or stress. And how long has the negative pattern been prevalent in the body? The practitioner and client will gauge the level of intensity and threshold that is best pending the type of sensation present. Sensations range from a ‘hurt so good’ satisfying release, to tenderness, to temporary, mild discomfort. The goal is to customize each Structural Integration session to match each client’s goals and that of the overall focus of the therapy. Structural integration is a very personal process and no one person is exactly alike. The client and practitioner work together as a team.

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What should I wear to a Structural Integration session?
Sessions are completed with comfortable attire for the client. Women commonly wear running shorts and sports bra or tank top, a 2-piece swimsuit, or undergarments. Men can wear undergarments or running shorts. Again, I urge clients to wear comfortable attire. The more comfortable the attire, the more engaged in the process the client can become and less worried about being uncomfortable or uncovered. All clients will have a blanket on them during the session to provide further protection and comfort. The blanket will be gently moved when the practitioner needs to work in a certain area of the body.

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What does a session look like?
First, the client and practitioner will discuss the goals of the treatment and how it relates to the client’s health history and primary concerns. The practitioner will assess how the client stands, walks, breathes, and generally moves with dialogue between client and practitioner. The client will occasionally provide small movements on or off the table to further the process of elongating and freeing the body. The practitioner can take before and after photos to track the progression upon client’s request.

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What are the benefits?
Structural Integration is a personal journey that creates overall well-being and balance through a physical process. Many benefits occur throughout the process. Some are subtle. Some are dramatic and encompass not just the physical aspects, butemotional, psychological, and spiritual areas too. Many clients say they feel taller, leaner and have gained a heightened sense of self, with optimal digestion, increased energy, better balance, and flexibility.

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Will the benefits of Structural Integration last?
Yes, the structural integration ten-series is a launching pad for continued ease, fluidity, and balance. Keep in mind however, as life changes, the body changes in response. Any injuries, accidents, lengthy illnesses and emotional stress may necessitate additional work.

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What’s the difference between Structural Integration and massage?
Massage and Structural Integration are both healing in nature, but the techniques performed are different. Both therapies include hands-on manipulation, but Structural Integration practitioners are broadening and lengthening connective tissue (fascia) to create fluidity, whereas massage is primarily concerned with muscles. Although there are various forms of massage, it is commonly used for relaxation achieving short-term results. Structural Integration aims to achieve longterm results via structure and alignment organizing, shaping, and integrating within the field of gravity. Those are not principles massage shares.
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Scar Tissue Therapy FAQ

What is Scar Tissue Therapy?
Scar tissue therapy will begin to erase the external scar and increase the capacity of the inner scar to let you move and align your body again. I’ll help you minimize the look and feel of your scars.
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Will I need a series of appointments or just one?
Scar Tissue Therapy is a stand-alone treatment however it can be used as an additional therapy to Structural Integration. Pending the severity of the scar, I can determine a treatment plan to get the results you’re looking for. On average, my client’s receive 3-6 treatments for the best results.
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How do fascia, connective tissue, and muscles relate to Scar Tissue Therapy?
Scar Tissue therapy works with the connective tissue that wraps around your muscles and entire body. By applying light pressure to this tissue, it will soften, elongate and restore the integrity for long term results.
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Will Scar Tissue Therapy hurt?
My clients are always amazed by the surprising light touch of the therapy. It literally feels like kneading bread dough — yet it’s targeted and extremely effective. With Scar Tissue Therapy, your nerves can be brought back to full function after treatment. And you’ll experience rapid and extensive improvements with your scars in a short period of time.
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What should I wear to a Scar Tissue Therapy session?
Scar Tissue Therapy sessions are similar to what you would experience for a massage. You will be between linens with a blanket placed on top of you for warmth.
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What does a session look like?
I’ll help you minimize the scars by assessing the scar and surrounding area. Scars are local and regional in the body. Although you may have a scar in one location, we want to be mindful other areas have been affected by the scar.
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Will the benefits of Scar Tissue Therapy last?
Yes. Many of my clients are amazed that within a few sessions they’re on the road to better living with less pain and sensations with an increased range of motion.
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Yoga FAQ

What can I expect from Yoga?
As a Certified Yoga Instructor, I’ll lead you through a practice that’s both invigorating and relaxing. If you’re a newcomer to Yoga, or if you’re well into your Yoga practice, I’ll help you get the most out of this optimal (and fun) exercise with private therapeutic Yoga training.

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What is therapeutic yoga?
Therapeutic Yoga is a blend of restorative yoga (supported postures), breath work, hands-on healing and guided meditation. This combination increases the bodies energy, fosters organ health, immunity and emotional well0being while decreasing stress.
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How do fascia, connective tissue, and muscles relate to Yoga?
Yoga aims to release areas of tension by creating the proper support system for each posture allowing the release within the physical body to occur. All muscles, bones, ligaments, tendons and generally connective tissue will be affected either on a subtle level. Over time with a consistent practice, these subtle benefits will increase to a gross change.
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What should I wear to a Yoga session?
Restorative and therapeutic yoga is performed with comfortable athletic clothes. Restorative yoga differs from other forms due it’s gentle flow you won’t be building heat like other forms of yoga. Even wearing socks can be recommended if your feet get cold. In each pose, there’s an opportunity to be covered with a blanket to maintain warmth, support and comfort.
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What does a session look like?
Each session, I will create a custom sequence for your needs and you only. Since each pose is held for a period of time between 5-15 minutes you may only complete 3-5 postures in each sequence but it will have a rhythm, purpose and reason behind it.
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What are the benefits?
Benefits include and not limited to:
Increased immunity
Decreased stress
Balanced hormones
Increased flexibility and range of motion
Balanced energy
Circadian rhythm become more consistent

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